Frequently Asked Questions

WHAT IS REDISTRICTING IN PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY?

Redistricting in Prince George’s County is the Charter-mandated process of redrawing Council Districts every ten years to adjust to population and demographic changes revealed after the completion of the United States Census.  

WHY IS REDISTRICTING IMPORTANT?

Redistricting is important because census data directly affects how federal and state funding is allocated to communities for neighborhood improvements, public health, education, transportation and more. Redistricting decides what district you live in and what specific offices you and your community members are eligible to vote for. Your elected official will have a vital role in deciding local laws and policies for years to come.

WHAT CHANGES DID THE 2020 CENSUS SHOW FOR THE COUNTY?

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the official 2020 Census data was not released until mid-August. As a result, the release of the adjusted prison population by the State was also delayed. Once all census data was adjusted for the County, the following population changes were realized: 

  • Overall population in the County increased by 12%. Total population grew from 863,420 in 2010 to 968,772 in 2021—an increase of 104,352
  • The County’s Hispanic/Latinx population increased from 128,000 to 205,000—a 60% increase. 
  • There were also increases in other population demographics, including Native Americans and multi-racial populations.
  • The County experienced a 25% decrease in the non-Hispanic White population.

HOW DO POPULATION SHIFTS IMPACT EXISTING DISTRICT BOUNDARIES?

Because the County recorded a total adjusted population of 968,772, the ideal population for each district is 107,641. Therefore, District boundaries are typically redrawn to satisfy legal requirements of ideal or equal population, one-person-one-vote, and Districts that are compact and contiguous.   

WHO DECIDES ON THE NEW LEGISLATIVE DISTRICTS?

Pursuant to the County Charter, the County Council has the final authority on Redistricting in Prince George's County.

WHAT IS THE REDISTRICTING COMMISSION?

On January 28, 2021, the Council adopted Council Resolution – 006-2021, appointing the 2021 Prince George’s County Redistricting Commission, pursuant to the provision of Section 305 of the County Charter, to establish Council Districts and requesting that a Redistricting Plan be submitted to the Council by September 1, 2021.  Due to COVID-19, the Commission met virtually.  All meetings were live-streamed, and meeting videos are archived for on-demand public access.   In accordance with the Charter, the Commission adopted the Proposed Plan and Report on August 30th, following a briefing to the Council.  The Commission submitted the Plan and Report to the Council on September 1, 2021.  

DID THE COUNTY COUNCIL PROPOSE A DIFFERENT PLAN FROM THE COMMISSION?

Yes.  The Commission briefed the Council on the Proposed Plan.  The Council held a Public Hearing on the Commission’s Plan and took the following actions:

  1. Council held work sessions on October 12 and 14, 2021, to consider an Alternate Plan and or Amendments.
  2. On October 14, 2021, Council reviewed proposed amendments and approved an Alternate Plan.
  3. On October 19, 2021, Council amended the Alternate Plan, which was introduced by legislation, CR-123-2021, and scheduled for a Public Hearing.

NEXT STEPS—VIRTUAL PUBLIC HEARING—NOVEMBER 16, 2021

In keeping with the Charter, the Council will hold a virtual Public Hearing on November 16, 2021.  The Council will hear public testimony and consider CR-123-2021, the Council’s Redistricting Plan, and the Redistricting Commission’s Proposed Plan. At the conclusion of the hearing, the Council will vote on the Plan proposed in CR-123-2021.  If the Council does not enact CR-123-2021, the Commission's Plan becomes law on the last day of November.

HOW CAN I PARTICIPATE IN THE PUBLIC HEARING?

To sign up to speak or to submit written comments visit HERE 

You can also email The Clerk of the Council clerkofthecouncil@co.pg.md.us , to become a Person of Record.